Tag Archives: History

Hull’s Alternative Heritage Plaques

Morning Beautiful People!

First of all, I’M FREE! No more marking, no more school and finally summer is here. Don’t get me wrong, I’m absolutely exhausted but at least another academic year is over. I hope all you lovely people are well and are enjoying the weekend.

Today I wanted to share with you a little discovery I’ve made in Hull. My previous post was about my birthday meal and walking home from there I passed a quirky blue sign. Hull has numerous heritage signs all around the city, but this one was ‘alternative’.

I researched into this and was absolutely amazed! I spent a couple of nights this week going round Hessle, the city centre and Newland Avenue to find more.

Firstly, some background information. The original Heritage Plaques, produced by English Heritage, originated in London from 1866. They celebrate notable figures and the buildings they lived or worked in. However, there was strict rules into obtaining one of these blue plaques. So, a local company, Drunk Animal Creative Studio created these plaques to celebrate the people of Hull who make up its beating heart now.

“The weird, the wonderful, the obscure, the fascinating stories and facts that permeate every street and every community in the city are now celebrated through out Alternative Heritage plaques.”

Clearly, this was going to be an opportunity for explorations. I started off dashing to Hessle for a food related sign. The heart wants what the heart wants, after all.

Then I drove back to the centre of down and had a mile and a half walk to locate the following, including finding the studio where these gems are created.

These were in the local shopping centre to celebrate the amazing Bee Lady, parks, on pub walls and on the wall by the always busy A63. As you can see, they celebrate the every day, the people in our community now.

The second evening where I went exploring was the other side of Hull really, around the Drypool Bridge area. Here I found links to mathematicians, food inventors (that can only be found in the city) and the controversial sporting decisions.

My final little walk was along Newland Avenue. I used to spend a lot of time down here at a student. It is down here that one of my favourite signs is. I’ll leave you to work out which one it is!

There’s 22 of these plaques in and around Hull so I guess I consider this part one. It’s become a bit of an obsession of mine to try and find them all. If I accidentally bump into you because I’m looking on walls instead of in front of me, you’ll at least know why.

I love everything about this. Hull has a deep and rich history, something which it’s residents are adding to daily. This is like something I’ve never seen before and it is awesome. Time to start researching where the next ones will take me!

Lastly, I hope you all have a fantastic summer. I’ll be catching up on everything I’ve missed – both commenting on your amazing posts and catching up with my own. My little blog has been a bit neglected but I’ll be back on it! I’ve also got some more books to hide for Left & Found this weekend too.

Big love all! Xx

 

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Filed under Alternative Heritage, Hull, Photography, Places, UK

Brick History

Hello you lovely lot!

Hope January is treating you well and you’re all embracing the joy that 2019 has offered so far. For me, it’s work as usual. However, I have managed to keep reading and visit a local exhibition that I want to share with you all today. It bought out the inner child in me again and I was completely amazed as I was walking around. Of course, I am talking about Lego. Who didn’t play with Lego when they were younger? It provided hours of fun!

Brick History is a free event which is currently on at the Hull History Centre. It takes famous moments in history and creates them all out of Lego blocks. Lego artist, Warren Elsmore and his team have created a celebration of our most famous moments in time. It features Mozart, Martin Luther King, the discovery of DNA, Viking Invasions, castles at war and everything in between. It was awesome!

One of my favourites was the Lego picture of Martin Luther King. I Have A Dream is one of the most important events in history so to see this represented in Lego was truly special. What a way to inspire the next generation.

I also really admired how they made a globe from Lego too. It has numerous lights on it and it spins to replicate our real globe. I was amazed to learn that the making of the globe is over 2000 years old. I never knew this before and I was really really shocked about its age. Fantastic really!

Next, I really loved the Lego model of the Viking Invasion. The colours were really bold. It’s so intricate and wonderful to see. It’s also incredibly lifelike too.

As we all know, I love my books, so I was excited to see a Lego version of Charles Darwin’s Origin of Species. Written in 1859, it has stood the test of time as this contains our believes and accepted understanding of how things evolve.

2018 marked the 100 year anniversary of women getting the vote. Therefore, it is only fitting that the suffragettes were also part of this Lego exhibition. In this piece, you can see a female Lego character chained to a railing, mirroring many protests from the suffragettes.

2009 brought another significant even in American history: the first black president was elected and sworn into office. Barak Obama changed the face of America for his years in office. I was chuffed to see this in Lego too.

The largest pieces are two castles depicting peace and war. Once again, the detail is just incredible. It’s hard to believe that everything is made just from Lego.

I was really blown away by this exhibition. I thought it was genuinely fascinating to see how such amazing moments in time could be made in Lego. It really does show you that the opportunities with Lego are endless. I think projects like this are so important for the next generation. For me, this was an excellent way to show history ready to inspire the next generation.

For information on Brick History at the History Centre, click here.

I hope you enjoyed this as much as I did. Big love all xx

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Filed under Days Out, Photography, Places, UK

Chedworth Roman Villa


Hey everyone! 

Hope you’re all having a great weekend. I took one last opportunity to go exploring, this time with my lovely Mum and Dad. We all work ridiculous hours, like many families, so we always try and make our time count. 

Followers of my blog will know how much we love our National Trust membership; this time we visited Chedworth Roman Villa. 

What blew me away was the fact that it was literally tucked away in the middle of nowhere. How did the Romans find it? Why that spot? So many unanswered questions. 


The biggest fascination I had was with the  fact that there’s still more to be discovered. Inside the museum, which was added in the Victorian period, parts of mosaic and stone were being still being found last year. It’s always quite inspiring to know there’s secrets hidden beneath the earth. 


The mosaic they have found so far are so beautiful. It’s incredible what has been preserved so far. 

Places like this require imagination. There are only parts left. But, I find that quite magical really. It’s giving you an active piece of history that you can interpret yourself. My favourite part: the bathhouse rooms and the outdoor water shrine. 

I enjoyed getting my geek on in terms of history this weekend. I hoped you enjoyed my photos! If you’d like more information, check out The National Trust Website


Big love to you all xxx

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Filed under Days Out, National Trust, Photography, UK

Brockhampton Estate


Happy Sunday everyone!

I’ve survived my first week back of a new term! However, I wanted to hold onto one last little piece of my holiday, a visit to the Brockhampton Estate. 

What I loved about here is there are two gorgeous, timber framed, medieval buildings surrounded by a moat. These date back to the 14th century. Imagine the comings and goings these buildings have seen. It fascinates me! 


It’s a shame it was fairly cloudy when I visited; it’s still rather impressive though.

The house is surrounded by 1000 acres of farmland and 700 acres of woodland. It’s a place where you can walk around and not bump into anyone. It’s rather peaceful for a working farm. 

 
Inside the house, there’s a lot of solid wood furniture, fires and glorious beds. You could even try out fashions of that period. (I had to of course!) 

I don’t want to ruin anymore surprises for you, but I would definitely recommend a visit. 

For more information check out The National Trust website. 

Big love! Xx

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Filed under Days Out, National Trust, Photography, UK